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Browning Auto 5 Magnum Friction Ring Settings for 2-3/4" loads


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#1 njluger

njluger
  • LocationHillsborough, NJ
  • Home Range:SCFGPA

Posted 05 September 2012 - 02:36 PM

I have an older Browning Auto 5 Magnum in 12-gauge that's capable of getting set to shoot heavy 3" loads or 2-3/4" loads. The previous owner used this gun as as his deer gun so he had a rifled barrel on it along with the recoil friction rings set to shoot heavy loads. Since I don't hunt, I'm adopting this gun for shooting claying and am trying to reset the friction rings properly.

I downloaded the manual from Browning site, http://media.brownin...5_mag_2up_s.pdf, but the directions aren't very clear...must've been written by a Belgium guy after a few beers ;) I set it up the way I think it should be and would appreciate anyone with more experience with the Auto 5 to comment on my photo below. Top of photo is the muzzle end and bottom is towards the receiver. I put the bronze friction piece, bevel side out towards the barrel guide ring, with the solid friction ring directly behind it, followed by the recoil spring, which rests against the receiver frame.

Thanks for any help!

Posted Image

#2 Smokin .50

Smokin .50
  • LocationNear Old Bridge NJ
  • Home Range:Old Bridge, Monmouth, Cherry Ridge, on the Farm in Vernon!

Posted 05 September 2012 - 04:37 PM

I have the Franchi version of this same gun.

I don't know by looking without inspecting mine, but I can tell you this:

If the previous owner had it set correctly to absorb the high brass loads, if you were to run 2 3/4 dram eq. low-brass loads and have the action NOT cycle, then turn the rings upside down and it should swallow and function with the low-brass loads.

So I can't tell from the image. BUT, if you didn't move anything prior to the photo, try reversing the rings as outlined in the instruction manual and then shooting low-brass. IF it cycles EVERY shot, you have it set for low-brass.

Hope that this helps.

Dave
Being SAFE is my FIRST priority. Bring enough Gun & have all of the Fun you can Handle! Have 10 Ga., WILL knock Pheasants out of the Sky!

#3 Parker

Parker
  • LocationExit 172 off the GSP
  • Home Range:Thunder Mountain & Mountainville, N.Y.

Posted 05 September 2012 - 05:34 PM

Go to page 15 of this PDF document and there is a picture which shows the rings and friction ring placement for 2 3/4" shells and 3" shells in the Magnum models.
http://www.midwestgu...vice_manual.pdf

Keep in mind that "light" 12 ga. target loads still may not cycle the action properly. It appears from your picture that you have the rings in the correct orientation for 2 3/4" loads. I would stick with at least 1 1/8 oz. target loads when set up for light loads and you should be okay. Of course, experimentation is the best way to judge what it shoots best. The Magnum models do like their 2 3/4" shells a tad on the heavy side.

Another useful link: http://www.browning....tail.asp?id=105

Hope this helps.

If only Jack O'Connor had written about the .270's effectiveness on Zombies, he might be known today as a decent gun scribe, and that cartridge might enjoy more widespread use...

 

America; one nation, under surveillance.


#4 Smokin .50

Smokin .50
  • LocationNear Old Bridge NJ
  • Home Range:Old Bridge, Monmouth, Cherry Ridge, on the Farm in Vernon!

Posted 06 September 2012 - 07:05 AM

Go to page 15 of this PDF document and there is a picture which shows the rings and friction ring placement for 2 3/4" shells and 3" shells in the Magnum models.
http://www.midwestgu...vice_manual.pdf

Keep in mind that "light" 12 ga. target loads still may not cycle the action properly. It appears from your picture that you have the rings in the correct orientation for 2 3/4" loads. I would stick with at least 1 1/8 oz. target loads when set up for light loads and you should be okay. Of course, experimentation is the best way to judge what it shoots best. The Magnum models do like their 2 3/4" shells a tad on the heavy side.

Another useful link: http://www.browning....tail.asp?id=105

Hope this helps.


My Franchi will cycle 2 3/4 dram eq. loads such as Gun Club Light which has 1 1/8 oz. of shot. If the Browning has trouble with THESE, then perhaps a steady diet of 3 dram loads of regular Gun Club (1200 FPS) is in order? I don't own the A-5, so I'm not quite sure. You would know better than I.

Thanks.

Dave
Being SAFE is my FIRST priority. Bring enough Gun & have all of the Fun you can Handle! Have 10 Ga., WILL knock Pheasants out of the Sky!

#5 njluger

njluger
  • LocationHillsborough, NJ
  • Home Range:SCFGPA

Posted 06 September 2012 - 08:30 AM

Thanks for the advice! Reading the manual over and over and the link that Parker sent, I think I have it set correctly, as shown in the photo above. I also tried searching on Youtube and that was just a source of more confusion. Alot of the videos for breaking down the Auto 5 and Remington 11 (same gun) there actually said to move the friction ring to the receiver end of the magazine tube, followed by the recoil spring and then the bronze friction piece. Interestingly enough, the Browning manual is contrary to that advice and states,

Remove the top friction brake and the top two friction rings as shown in figure 4. This is also the correct setting for all steel shot loads. The top friction rings and brake should be removed entirely and not simply placed under the recoil spring.


I'll go by what the manufacturer says...I'll be shooting some clays this weekend so I'll take a long a few types of loads to see what works best with this setup.

#6 Parker

Parker
  • LocationExit 172 off the GSP
  • Home Range:Thunder Mountain & Mountainville, N.Y.

Posted 06 September 2012 - 10:33 AM

Thanks for the advice! Reading the manual over and over and the link that Parker sent, I think I have it set correctly, as shown in the photo above. I also tried searching on Youtube and that was just a source of more confusion. Alot of the videos for breaking down the Auto 5 and Remington 11 (same gun) there actually said to move the friction ring to the receiver end of the magazine tube, followed by the recoil spring and then the bronze friction piece. Interestingly enough, the Browning manual is contrary to that advice and states,



I'll go by what the manufacturer says...I'll be shooting some clays this weekend so I'll take a long a few types of loads to see what works best with this setup.


Light 12 & 20 and standard A5's (12, 16, 20) come with only one (1) bronze friction ring and one (1) flat surfaced/beveled surface friction ring. On both Light models and standard models, the bronze friction ring and flat/beveled ring are set up forward of the spring against the concave of the barrel for heavy loads. For light loads, the bronze friction ring is forward of the spring against the barrel ring, while the flat/bevel ring is in front of the receiver, bevel side in, flat side toward the spring.

On 3" Magnum models (12 & 20,) the setup is very different. There are two (2) bronze friction rings and three (3) flat-beveled friction rings, all which need to be deployed to shoot 3" shells. When shooting "light" 2 3/4" dram eq. shells, you exclude one (1) bronze friction ring and two (2) of the flat/beveled friction rings. Both and bronze friction ring and a flat/beveled friction ring are utilized in front of the recoil spring against the barrel ring. (The "light" load setup for bronze friction ring and flat/beveled friction ring on the 3" Magnum models is the same as a "heavy" load setup on Light 12 & 20 and standard 12,16 & 20 gauge models.) Confused yet?

(Some A5's had a diagram glued to the inside of the forearm wood that depicts the proper setup for light and heavy loads with the rings. It is easy to forget sometimes.)

How John M. Browning came up with this cockamamie system and then got it to work where it's stood the test of time for more than a hundred years is only testament to his genius.

If only Jack O'Connor had written about the .270's effectiveness on Zombies, he might be known today as a decent gun scribe, and that cartridge might enjoy more widespread use...

 

America; one nation, under surveillance.


#7 njluger

njluger
  • LocationHillsborough, NJ
  • Home Range:SCFGPA

Posted 06 September 2012 - 11:45 AM

Parker, thanks for the detailed explanation between the two. I didn't realize the Auto 5 and the Auto 5 Magnum were two variants! I understand the setup know and see how it works. I did find the diagram glued on the inside of the forearm but it was a bit faded and hard to read.

The more I learn about the way this action works, the more amazed I am at Browning's genius for sure!

#8 Parker

Parker
  • LocationExit 172 off the GSP
  • Home Range:Thunder Mountain & Mountainville, N.Y.

Posted 06 September 2012 - 12:50 PM

Parker, thanks for the detailed explanation between the two. I didn't realize the Auto 5 and the Auto 5 Magnum were two variants! I understand the setup know and see how it works. I did find the diagram glued on the inside of the forearm but it was a bit faded and hard to read.

The more I learn about the way this action works, the more amazed I am at Browning's genius for sure!


There are some significant differences between the Magnum models and the standard and Light models. There are only subtle differences between the Light and standard A5's. Enjoy it, they are great shotguns.

If only Jack O'Connor had written about the .270's effectiveness on Zombies, he might be known today as a decent gun scribe, and that cartridge might enjoy more widespread use...

 

America; one nation, under surveillance.


#9 Parker

Parker
  • LocationExit 172 off the GSP
  • Home Range:Thunder Mountain & Mountainville, N.Y.

Posted 06 September 2012 - 02:51 PM


The more I learn about the way this action works, the more amazed I am at Browning's genius for sure!


Since yours is a Magnum, I assume you have the speed-loading feature? That's a unique nicety.

If only Jack O'Connor had written about the .270's effectiveness on Zombies, he might be known today as a decent gun scribe, and that cartridge might enjoy more widespread use...

 

America; one nation, under surveillance.


#10 njluger

njluger
  • LocationHillsborough, NJ
  • Home Range:SCFGPA

Posted 06 September 2012 - 03:31 PM

Is that the feature of when you load a shell into the mag, it's chambered automatically? Yes - I've tried it so far with snap caps and it works well.

#11 Parker

Parker
  • LocationExit 172 off the GSP
  • Home Range:Thunder Mountain & Mountainville, N.Y.

Posted 06 September 2012 - 04:46 PM

Is that the feature of when you load a shell into the mag, it's chambered automatically? Yes - I've tried it so far with snap caps and it works well.


Yes.

If only Jack O'Connor had written about the .270's effectiveness on Zombies, he might be known today as a decent gun scribe, and that cartridge might enjoy more widespread use...

 

America; one nation, under surveillance.





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